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 Air Ceylon

JET AIRCRAFT OPERATED BY AIR CEYLON

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De Havilland Comet 4 Vickers-Armstrongs VC10

Convair 990 Coronado

Boeing B707 / 720
Douglas DC-8 Hawker Siddeley HS 121 Trident
Air Ceylon Propeller Aircraft Air Ceylon Home Page


 

Boeing 707 / 720

707

 

The 720 is a smaller capacity, lighter, medium range variant of the 707, given its own model number to indicate significant engineering changes.

Introduced in 1959, the 720 (originally designated 707-020) retained the same basic structure as the 707-120, but was 2.54m (8ft 4in) shorter, which reduced seating to 112 (38 + 74) in a typical two class arrangement. Other changes were made to the wing which introduced full span leading edge flaps, while a glove between the inner engines and the fuselage increased wing sweep and wing area and decreased the wing's thickness/chord ratio. The changes to the wing made it more aerodynamically efficient, permitting higher cruising speeds and lowered minimum speeds (which aided field performance).

Like the early 707s the first 720s had JT3C turbojets, although less powerful models lacking water injection because of the 720's lighter weight. Compared with the 707-120 the 720 also had reduced fuel capacity and a lower max takeoff weight. But many components were interchangeable between the 720 and 707, while inside the cabin the 720 and 707 shared the same passenger interior and flight deck.

The initial 720 (bound for launch customer United) first flew on November 23 1959. Certification was awarded on June 30 1960, and entry into service with United Airlines was on July 5 that year.

The availability of the far more fuel efficient Pratt & Whitney JT3D turbofan resulted in the 720B, which was powered by either JT3D1s or 3s. First flight of the 720B was on October 6 1960, with certification awarded on March 3 1961. The 720B also featured a higher maximum zero fuel weight (significantly boosting payload/range) and an increased max takeoff weight due to the heavier turbofan engines.

Major 720 operators included American Airlines (a number of its 720s were converted to 720Bs with turbofan engines), United, Continental, Eastern, Northwest Orient and Western, while operators outside the US included Lufthansa and Avianca.

Production      
Between 1959 and 1969 Boeing built 65 720s and 89 720Bs (many 720s were converted to 720Bs). One in commercial service in Africa, three others used as corporate transports.

Air Ceylon Aircraft

N64696 Boeing 720-022 c/n 18073 1976-1977 leased
4R-ACS Boeing 720-023 c/n 18013 1977-1977 leased

707 plan

707 cutaway

707 cockpit

707 engines

707

4R-ACS (cn 18013/120) This Monarch Al B720 (G-BCBB) was leased to Air Ceylon between March-December 1977

707

707

Boeing 720-023B 4R-ACS at London - Heathrow (LHR / EGLL) UK - England, July 29, 1977

Ex Monarch (G-BCBB) aircraft was leased to Air Ceylon between March-December 1977

 

707

London - Luton (LTN / EGGW) UK - England, July 1, 1977

4R-ACS at London Heathrow - 11 April, 1977

Air Ceylon (Ex United Airlines) B720 at Brussels, June 1976

707

FSX  Air Ceylon 707

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Douglas DC-8

DC-8

Douglas DC-8-41 Singapore - Paya Lebar (QPG / WSAP), November 1976

 

The popular DC-8 was Douglas' first jet powered airliner, and the USA's second successful jet powered transport behind the Boeing 707.

Despite its strong hold on the world airliner market in the early 1950s, and the appearance of the jet powered De Havilland Comet in 1949, Douglas moved cautiously into the field of jet powered transports, a decision which was to cost it dearly in lost potential sales over the following decades.

Douglas announced it was developing the jet powered DC-8 airliner in June 1955, a year after the first flight of the Boeing Model 367-80, the 707 predecessor. The first DC-8 flew on May 30 1958, five months before the 707 entered service with Pan Am. A concerted flight test program involving nine aircraft led to certification being awarded on August 31 1959. Entry into commercial service with launch customers United and Delta was on September 18 that year.

Unfortunately for Douglas, the earlier availability of the 707 meant that initial sales of the DC-8 were relatively slow. However, the emergence of Douglas' design had already forced Boeing to widen the fuselage width of the 707, and unlike the Boeing the DC-8 was offered in domestic and intercontinental versions from the start.

Versions of the initial short fuselage DC-8 were: the Series 10, the initial domestic version with 60.1kN (13,500lb) P&W JT3C-6 turbojets - 28 were built for Delta and United; the similar Series 20 but with more powerful 74.7kN (16,800lb) JT4A-9 turbojets; the intercontinental Series 30 and Series 40, powered by JT4A-11s or Rolls-Royce Conways respectively; and the Series 50, perhaps the definitive short fuselage model and a direct competitor to the 707-320B/C, with 80.1kN (18,000lb) JT3D-3 turbofans. Convertible 50CF and pure freight 50AF Jet Trader versions were also offered, while others were subsequently converted to freighters.

The short fuselage DC-8s were replaced in production by the substantially larger stretched DC-8 Super Sixty series.

Air Ceylon Aircraft

OO-TCP Douglas DC-8-32 c/n 45265 1974-1974 leased
4R-ACQ Douglas DC-8-53 c/n 45604 1972-1978  
4R-ACT Douglas DC-8-43 c/n 45445 1977-1978  

DC-8 plan

DC-8 cutaway

DC-8 cockpit

    DC-8 Engines   

DC-8 red

Pomair DC-8 was ex Pan Am and was leased to Air Ceylon
 

DC-8

DC-8

DC-8    DC-8

DC-8

DC-8

DC-8

Douglas DC-8-53 Miami - International (MIA / KMIA), USA - Florida, May 1979

 

DC-8

DC-8

| INDEX |


 

Hawker Siddeley HS 121 Trident

Trident

 

The Hawker Siddeley HS 121 Trident (alternatively the D.H.121) was a British short/medium-range three-engined jet airliner designed by de Havilland and built by Hawker Siddeley in the 1960s and 1970s. The Trident is notable for its pioneering avionics which enabled it to become the first airliner to make a fully automatic approach and landing in revenue service in 1965 and to be the sole airliner capable of automatic landings in regular service from 1966 until versions of the Lockheed TriStar were also cleared to perform them in the mid-1970s

Designed very tightly around a British European Airways (BEA) specification, the Trident had modest sales, with 117 produced. The political and industrial aspects of its emergence, development, production, operation, and marketing were highly controversial in the 1960s and 1970s. Commentators have felt that the sales prospects and commercial usefulness of the type were gravely compromised because undue attention was paid to the needs of its launch customer who first insisted that it should be made much smaller than originally envisaged and who then insisted that it should be enlarged practically beyond the limits of its airframe and powerplant.

BEA's successor, British Airways retired the type in the early-mid 1980s. In China the Trident remained active in Air China service until the 1990s.

Air Ceylon Aircraft

4R-ACN

Hawker Siddeley Trident 1E-140

c/n 2135 1969-1978


Trident

Trident details

Trident cockpit

Trident engines   

Trident at SIA

Air Ceylon initially planned to purchase the Trident 2E but took up the remaining Trident 1E ordered by Channel Airways at the price of £2.2m to join it's route network but also had an option on another possibly the 2E . The aircraft was delivered to the airline on 19 July 1969 and was the last 1E to be delivered. Air Ceylon operated a two class 88 seat layout on scheduled services from Colombo to Bangkok, Bombay, Karachi, Madras and Singapore at a later date services to Delhi and Kuala Lumpur. The aircraft served the airline until it was withdrawn from use in July 1978 and then used as an instructional airframe for many years and even wore a test Air Lanka color scheme until scrapped in the 1990's.

Trident

HS-121 Trident 1E Singapore - Paya Lebar (QPG / WSAP), December 1976

 

Trident

4R-ACN (cn 2135) Kuala Lumpur - Subang / Sultan Abdul Aziz Shah (SZB / WMSA) Malaysia, March 1978

 

Trident

HS-121 Trident 1E Paris - Le Bourget (LBG / LFPB) France, June 7, 1969

 

Trident scrap

 



AC-LOGO

 

De Havilland Comet 4 Vickers-Armstrongs VC10

Convair 990 Coronado

Boeing B707 / 720
Douglas DC-8 Hawker Siddeley HS 121 Trident
Air Ceylon Propeller Aircraft Air Ceylon Home Page
  

I've never seen an airplane yet that can read the type ratings on your pilot's license.

- Chuck Boedecker -
 

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